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Possibility of Specific Anti-Gang Legislation

The Davis administration is reviewing current legislation to determine how to move forward with an anti-gang bill.

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS – The Davis administration is reviewing current legislation to determine how to move forward with an anti-gang bill as a part of plans to clamp down on a wave of bloodshed.

Our Jasmin Brown has reaction from the head of a local rehabilitation program and a former gang member, who say it will take more than just talk to end the spree of violence.



For weeks authorities have said a gang war over drug turf has helped fuel the violence that has seen dozens of young men gunned down, particularly in New Providence.

Former gang member turned Teen Challenge Bahamas resident Ambrose Smith says he knew some of the victims well.

Gang violence has resurfaced in the headlines in recent weeks.

Prime Minister Philip Davis addressed the issue during the office of the prime minister’s weekly press briefing on Thursday.

His comments were echoed by Attorney General Ryan Pinder, who told The Nassau Guardian the government is determining how to move forward with a specific anti-gang bill.

Police have said there are 10 active gangs in New Providence.

The last Christie administration enacted harsher penalties for people who participate in, or are a part of, organized criminal groups including a fine of $500,000, and imprisonment for 20 years, subject to a minimum term of 15 years.

Smith, who joined a gang at the age of 14 but left it after joining the Teen Challenge Bahamas program three years ago, says he does not think penalties will deter people, who are consumed with getting even.

Executive Director of Teen Challenge Bahamas Dr. Eric Fox says while proper legislation is necessary there needs to be more than punishment.

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