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WU: We Have to Keep Pressing on Gender-Based Violence Bill

NASSAU, BAHAMAS – One day after the state minister for Social Services suggested the gender-based violence bill will likely address marital rape, a women’s group is urging the Davis administration to bring it before cabinet and enact it.

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS – One day after the state minister for Social Services suggested the gender-based violence bill will likely address marital rape, a women’s group is urging the Davis administration to bring it before cabinet and enact it.

After seeing firsthand the horrors that victims of abuse have endured, members of Women United stressed that without government intervention and funding, this “social crisis” will get worse.

While she applauded State Minister for Social Services Lisa Rahming for helping to keep the issue of gender-based violence on the front burner, attorney Lisa Bostwick-Dean pointed out there is a long way to go before the NGO’s fighting on the frontlines get the assistance and funding they need to assist victims of abuse.

On Thursday, Rahming told reporters a proposed gender-based violence bill would likely address marital rape. However, she could not give a timeline for the completion of the bill.

The Office of the Prime Minister then pointed out the proposed legislation has not yet gone before cabinet.

Bostwick-Dean, who served in the Senate until 2021, said she had the opportunity to see the gender-based violence bill, which creates an overarching trust, which would register NGOs and be funded with an estimated two million dollars to support approved initiatives.

Women United (WU), which has blossomed to over 500 members since it was formed in 2018, has helped women to flee toxic situations, by putting a roof over their heads and securing jobs.

Group member Sheila Farrington-Pritchard fears that without help, the worst is not over.

Founder Prodesta Moore says WU members dig deep to pay rent for some families for three months as they search for long-term accommodations. With the government’s resources, she believes they can do so much more.

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