Connect with us

National

Today in History: July 7

THE BAHAMAS – A gruesome murder, a memorable retirement and a Governor-General steps down. See what events took place on this day in history.

Published

on


Advertisement

Advertisement

THE BAHAMAS – On this day in Bahamian history…

In 1943 – The largest land owner in the Bahamas, Sir Harry Oakes was murdered at his estate, Westbourne, in Nassau.

Sir Harry Oakes was a gold mine owner, investor, resort owner, philanthropist and politician.

Born in the United States, he made his fortune in Canada as a gold prospector. He then obtained British citizenship and moved to the Bahamas in 1935 where he lived until his death.

Oakes’s body was found in a gruesome state by Harold Christie who was staying as a guest in his house. His body had been doused with gasoline, burned and covered with feathers.

After the authorities were made aware of his death the then governor, Duke of Windsor took control of the investigation. Two days later Alfred de Marigny was arrested and charged with murder.

Alfred de Marigny was Sir Harry’s son-in-law through marriage to his daughter Nancy. Oakes had not approved of the marriage however so the couple eloped. Although de Marigny was charged, he was found not guilty and Oakes’s murder remains unsolved to this day.


Then in 1997 – The Honorable Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling, retired from font line politics.

Sir Pindling was the first prime minister of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, serving the country for more than 40 years.

Sir Pindling served in Parliament from 1956 to 1992, became Premier in 1967 and Prime Minister in 1969. He led The Bahamas to independence in 1973 and served as head of government until his defeat in 1992.

After the Progressive Liberal Party’s defeat in the 1997 general election…. he retired a few months later giving his farewell speech at the House of Assembly as he stepped down as Member of Parliament for South Andros.


Finally in 2014 – Sir Arthur Foulkes stepped down as Governor-General of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Born in Mathew Town Inagua on May 11, 1928 Foulkes had been working in the government field for a long time. He worked at the tribune as a linotype operator and proof reader in 1948 before becoming the founding editor of the Bahamian Times.

Sir Foulkes was elected to office in 1967 serving various offices throughout the years. Under his leadership the country’s tourism sector saw impressive gains in 1969 and thanks to his ministerial watch Bahamasair flew internationally to Europe for the first time.

As the eighth Governor general of The Bahamas, Sir Arthur Foulkes had been sworn in on April 14th, 2010. In recognition of this Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Second elevated his status to the Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George.

Author

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending